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Hacksaw Ridge - One can say a lot of stuff about Mel Gibson, but a bad director one simply cannot ever call him. And Hacksaw Ridge is another great example of this. Hacksaw Ridge tells the story of Desmond T. Doss, a deeply religious man who refused to even touch a gun during his military training or in combat. The first 40 minutes of the film just tells the story of his youth, and they are necessary to be able to build some meat on the main character. There's a few good points and such in the story, most importantly to believe in yourself and what you think is right. Stand for it and be proud. But as the underlying themes of religion is so strong I do have a few problems with it. 

 

But after those 40 minutes is over and they are going into combat everything is forgotten. As hell breaks loose, things gets really interesting and Mel Gibson gets to show off his skills. The war scenes are among the most intense, dark, brutal, gritty and chaotic I've ever seen in a war film, and it really makes for a lovely watch. And from there on and out, the film is excellent.

 

Andrew Garfield and Vince Vaughn are really great. Those early scenes with Vince Vaughn are exceptional because of his skills.

 

Aguirre, der Zorn Gottes - One of many classic Werner Herzog films, and one of his very best. It marks his first collaboration with Klaus Kinski, and is about a group of conquistadors traveling down the Amazon in search for El Dorado. It's slow, is sparse on the dialogue and focus on atmosphere to bring forth a certain madness and surrealistic feeling to it all. It has no proper sets and was made on a small budget, but it is visually stunning because of Werner Herzog's eye for details and cinematographer Thomas Mauch's skills with the camera. Popol Vuh stood for the soundtrack, and as with Nosferatu it's exceptional and a huge part of why the film is as good as it is.

 

The first 4-5 minutes are among the very best scenes ever filmed. The photo combined with the beautiful music is just too damn good. It's just magnificent in its simplicity.

 

 

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Game Over, Man! - This film has been panned by the critics and I can understand why, but I liked this quite a lot. It's childish, grotesque, violent, and offensive, but I don't mind any of those things. Didn't laugh at everything, but when it did make me laugh I could not stop laughing. I can see this becoming a proper cult film in the future.

 

30 Minutes or Less - Another action-comedy. I liked it as much as Game Over, Man! but it's not offensive enough. I wish it was further out there as the film has a lot of good qualities. But it kept me very, very entertained and both Aziz Ansari, Danny McBride and Nick Swardson and very funny throughout the film.

 

Kill the Irishman - Cool crime film about Danny Greene, an Irish-american thug from the 70's who more or less spent his life making fun of the mafia and how weak they had become. It was slightly disappointing, but it was good nonetheless and Vincent D'Onofrio is superb in his supporting role.

 

13 Hours - A Michael Bay film that doesn't feel like a Michael Bay film, is a Michael Bay film that I can properly enjoy. 13 Hours is pretty much the opposite of what you'd imagine a Michael Bay movie would be like, a bit like Pain & Gain (albeit not nearly as good as Pain & Gain). It's a pretty mature film, and unlike shit like Transformers this isn't aimed towards a young audience, but a mature one. It has a lot more than huge robots, big explosion and a good looking cast. That doesn't mean it's perfect though. For some reason there's not a main character here. No-one stands out. When the film is finished, you'd remember the one with the most screen time as much as the one who had 50 minutes less screen time.

 

The build up of the movie isn't too interesting and the first big fight isn't either, but around half way into the film it turns into a military version of Assault on Precinct 13 and that's when shot turns good. The battle sequences are really good, and I like the start-stop-start-stop formula. I also like how gritty and brutal it is. There's nothing glamorous about war, and it gets that right.

 

Not a big fan of the patriotism thou, and american patriotism is the worst by a long shot. I'm also not sure why these "heroes" are so glorified in the film. But it doesn't matter. Entertaining film.

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Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri - 9/10
Frances McDormand plays a mother who rents three billboards to call attention to her daughter's unsolved murder. Haven't seen a good movie in ages, but is one of the best I've seen in a long time. 

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Hi there! Have a nice day! Movies online

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Happy Death Day (2017) - Kind of cliche at times, but it was a fun watch.

 

Also watched Cell 213 (2011), which was one of the worst things I've seen in a while. Cute lead actor though. Was kind of amused to see Michael Rooker in it. 

Edited by violetchain

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Logan Lucky - In many ways this is just Steven Soderbergh repeating himself, as Logan Lucky is just Ocean's Eleven with a different setting, mood and type of characters. The plot, the stylish execution and the nice visual style is the same. But I love Ocean's Eleven so I won't complain. Logan Lucky is a smart, stylish and fun heist film with an ensemble cast lead on by  Channing Tatum, Adam Driver, Riley Keough and Daniel Craig, and all gets lots of room to play around and do their own thing.

 

Channing Tatum proves that he is a lot more than a pretty face and a good body, and Daniel Craig is super cool and good as the IN-CAR-CER-ATED Joe Bang. While his accent might not be perfect, especially when he has to deliver a lot of lines, he does real good with it. I was really surprised by it.

 

Overall a real nice and good film. Really enjoyed myself throughout its two hour running time.

 

Now You See Me 2 - I wasn't too impressed by the first one, but since I watched it I just had to see this too. And while not a very good film, it's a lot better than the first. It looks and sounds very good, it's well-acted throughout and the chemestry between the "four horsemen", included the hidden fifth, is very good and more or less what drives the film. The thing that really lets me down is the "magic tricks" and how they reveal everything at the end. Like a magic trick it would've been so much better if they had left us wondering about how they did all this and all that. Because the last trick is so far-fetched when you know how they did it, but if they had not told us anything it would've seemed plausible at least. So that's a huge problem.

 

But I'll watch the third one whenever it gets here.

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Free Fire - I don't exactly try to hide my love for Ben Wheatley and his two masterpieces Kill List and A Field in England, as well as Down Terrace, and with Free Fire his back at making top, top, top class films. Free Fire is a Quentin Tarantino-esque gangster comedy and a chamber play with great characters, cool, witty dialogue, a fantastic 70's setting and an awesome visual style. In no way, shape or form does Ben Wheatley try to hide his influences, but nor does he copy them. He turns and twist everything he does into his own with his own character added to the films, and Free Fire is no different. It wears its influences proudly on its sleeve, but does more than enough to add his own twist, turns and character to the film.

 

It's basically one long acting scene, but it works so fucking good. I will have to re-watch it before I call it a masterpiece, but after seeing it one time I gave it a 9/10. Ben Wheatley proves why again why I rank him as one of the most interesting directors of the last 18 years. Daring, bold and original.

 

 

Will watch High-Rise after I get home from work today. It's another recent Ben Wheatley flick that seem to have been well received by the same type of people who enjoy Kill List, A Field in England Free Fire, Down Terrace and Sightseers. He's one of those that does his own thing, and the majority of his films won't please a big audience. But it'll please a small core of people into the types of films he makes.

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High-Rise - High-Rise is  Ben Wheatley's dystopian drama adaption of a novel by the same name from the mid 70's. The film is about a luxury apartment building and its breakdown. The entire film is about class warfare, and the separation of the classes. So it's a very political film. But it's much more. It's also damn good entertainment with a cast consisting of the likes of Tom Hiddleston, Sienna Miller, Luke Evans and Jeremy Irons leading the way through this ice cold, insane dystopian drama. It's a slow-burner and it'll divide the audience, but I liked it very much.

 

It does not reach up to Kill List, A Field in England, Free Fire or Down Terrace, but Ben Wheatley hit the nail on its head once again.

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All About Lily Chou-Chou: In a sense, it can be called a 'coming of age' story. At the same time, the movie is far more pessimistic than most ordinary 'coming of age' stories I've seen/read  (though I have to be honest here - I haven't had a lot of experience with that particular genre). Somehow the entire film has this very nostalgic, almost melancholic feel to it, partially helped by the film's brilliant soundtrack. Everything somehow feels very natural, very real, even the 'darker' turns taken within the story. I was left very impressed after watching it, though I feel like the film would've had an even stronger impact on me had I seen it at a younger age. Anyway, I feel like everyone who's ever used music as a means of escapism or coping with the problems in their life will in some form connect to this in some sense.

 

Lesson Faust: Czech director Jan Svankmajer's take on the well-known story of Dr. Faustus. Cobbles together aspects from different incarnations of the story and gives it a unique twist of its own. Svankmajer's  version of Faust (the character) appears to be an average middle-aged guy who one day decides to follow the instructions written on a map and ends up in a bizarre puppet theater. What follows is... insanity, really. Tables spraying fountains of wine, giant wooden devil heads rolling through a forest, a homeless man carrying a severed human leg... It has a lot of common 'Svankmajer-isms' sprinkled throughout, including copious amounts of bizarre stopmotion sequences, a general atmosphere of uncomfortable surrealism and rundown/decaying locales. Svankmajer is high up there among my all-time favorite directors, and this movie only proves once again how utterly unique his works are. Highly recommended to anyone who's into weird stuff.

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Maze Runner: The Death Cure - A step up from The Scorch Trials, but another very disappointing sequel to a surprisingly good and entertaining first film. It offers nothing at all, and like The Scorch Trials it doesn't feel like it has anything to do with the first at all. The first had a good concept and all, this has nothing. Boring as fuck. And way, way, way too long.

 

Land of the Lost - Watched this late last night, drunk out of my mind with a friend. Damn, it was so bad. I expected it to be bad, but it was godawful. It had me laughing a few times, but I would not have laughed at it had I been alone. So yeah, poor stuff.

 

CHIPS - A good cast can't save this abysmal crapfest of a film. It's based off an older TV-series, but it captures nothing of that series at all. Crap!

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Rampage

Saw this movie last night and it's pretty much a straight up popcorn flick. I had no idea this was an adaptation of a retro video game but I found it more entertaining than Tomb Raider.

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The Bourne Legacy - Jeremy Renner and Rachel Weisz acts their heart out throughout the entire film, but even their great efforts isn't enough to make this more than decent. The characters are paper thin and shallow as fuck and the plot is twisting and turning way too much for its own good. It never gets the time to do anything before it jumps to the next. Gets real tiring after a while. I do appreciate the dialogue though. It's concise.

 

I don't get the title of the film either. Yes, it is set in the same universe as the Bourne movies, and yes the actions of Jason Bourne is why everything happens in this film. But still, it got nothing to do with Jason Burne. Wish they'd think up a proper title for the film.

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Heavy Metal in Baghdad - Filmmakers Eddy Moretti and Suroosh Alvi travels to Iraq to find and meet Acrassicauda, the first and only metal band in Iraq at this time. It's an interesting documentary both when it takes a look at the band and their troubles, as well as when it looks at the situation in general during these times. Recommended.

 

Syrian Metal Is War - Unlike Heavy Metal in Baghdad this doesn't focus on one single band, but the entire Syrian metal scene in a war-torn Syria. Director Monzer Darwish isn't a very talented man and he more often than not struggles to get his camera in focus, but there's a sense of passion here that I feel is missing in Heavy Metal in Baghdad. A Stronger DIY-feeling that I really like.

 

Very interesting both when it looks at the scene itself, but also when it looks as Syria as a country and fucked up it has become. Good stuff this.

 

Heavy Metal Parking Lot - It only clocks in at 17 minutes, but Heavy Metal Parking Lot may be the greatest rock/metal documentary ever made. A very straight-forward documentary as some guys walk around a parking lot before a Judas Priest and Dokken concenrt in the mid 80's and talk to fans who are attending the concert later. The atmosphere is fantastic, the people are fantastic and there's no bullshit. 

 

One of those films you have to watch. A must-see for everyone in the entire fucking world.

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Signed up for a free trial of HBO just to watch the Andre the Giant documentary. Heard a lot of praise from some wrestling podcasts I regularly listen to, even though I'm not quite familiar with classic wrasslin', but I was quite fascinated with people like Andre. It's short and sweet, and sums up Andre's story pretty well, including his origins, the troubles he's had since being "the biggest celebrity in the world", the myths surrounding him, the circumstances surrounding his match with Hulk Hogan, and eventually his final years as he truly began to deteriorate. Although I don't find everything about Andre credible (especially the stories about his drinking), I learned a lot of new stuff about him such as him actually having a daughter, how he strived for normalcy despite his unique appearance, and most importantly how he was the first true attraction in wrestling.

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