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Horror Movies

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I'm going to second in shilling Deep Red, Inferno, Tenebre, Phenomena and Opera at least. I haven't seen The Cat o' Nine Tails, Two Evil Eyes, Trauma or The Stendhal Syndrome yet, but they're on my watch list. Despite their status as genre classics, The Bird with the Crystal Plumage and Four Flies on Grey Velvet didn't do as much for me as those other ones.. Between those two I definitely liked the latter more, though. 

 

Recent watches:

Body Bags, horror anthology featuring 2 shorts directed by John Carpenter and 1 by Tobe Hooper. I personally feel like the first two segments (the Carpenter ones) were the best. The first is just a tense thrill ride set overnight at a gas station, and the second one is a hilarious story about a vain man's fear of going bald. The final segment felt just a tad TOO predictable, and even despite some of the nice gore effects and a solid performance by Mark Hamill it's my least favorite of the three. The frame bit featuring John Carpenter himself as the horror host is gold, by the way

 

Berberian Sound Studio, I see this listed as a horror film in several locations, but to me it just feels like 'British nerd gets bullied by Foreigners: The Movie'. David Lynch's influence is palpable here, as well as the creator's love for the italo-horror scene. Great soundtrack and some VERY great visuals, but I found the movie to be lacking in terms of an actual story. 

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Thanks for the recs bear and tokage. I watched Phenomena the other day and enjoyed it. It may not be as visually pleasing as Suspiria, but it still had it's own special air. They were also some pretty awesome grotesque scenes, especially towards the end when shit got crazy. that pool of maggots and rotten bodies tho holy crap

Great film overall. It was fun to see what might have influenced the Clock Tower snes game too, particularly the aspect of a serial killer chasing young girls and a hidden double personality from the female lead. For some reason though, the version I was watching missed a few spots in their English dub, but I guess they didn't think it was important and decided to leave it undubbed....

 

I'll check the rest of Dario Argento's films later~

Edited by plastic_rainbow

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44 minutes ago, plastic_rainbow said:

For some reason though, the version I was watching missed a few spots in their English dub, but I guess they didn't think it was important and decided to leave it undubbed....

 

This is very normal for an italian western/horror/exploitation film from the 60's through 80's. The reason being that they hired people of different nationality. Like Phenomena, the cast consists of actors of american, british, belgian, italian and probably other nationality. So no matter if you watch them in english or american, it'll be dubbed and the sound will not match the mouths a lot of the time.

 

So take Suspiria. There were, as far as I know, not recorded any sound during the shots, or at least not properly, and the actors spoke in their own languages. Jessica Harper in English, Stefania Casini in Italian, Udo Kier spoke German and so on. Which makes the dubbing work extremely difficult.

 

Or take The Good, the Bad and The ugly. Clint Eastwood,Lee Van Cleef and Eli Wallach spoke English during shots, while Aldo Giuffre, Mario Brega and Luigi Pistilli spoke italian. So this is another film where the sound won't match the mouths. However, in the english dub of the film we do get the voice of Eastwood, Van Cleef and Wallach, while the italian cast is subbed, and vice-versa in the italian version of the film.

 

Now, that's the film history lesson for today. Hope you enjoyed and learnt something new. :P

 

 

I'm not sure if I said this already, but the most similar film to Suspiria you'll find is Inferno. Visually it's perhaps a bit more colourful, and it doesn't have the same story. But the overall tone, especially visually, is similar and of course beautiful.

 

But if we're only talking visual style and with a slightly dreamy feeling to it, films like Crimson Peak, The Strange Colour of Your Body's Tears, Amer and Kwaidan might also fit your interest here. All very different both from eachother and Suspiria, but they do have stunning visual style and very dream-like atmosphere.

 

Crimson Peak is a visually stunning romantic gothic horror film which is as much a romantic film as anything else. Good, but disappointing. Visually stunning and with some of that dreamy-feeling to it, tho not as nightmarish as Suspiria or Inferno.

 

The Strange Colour of Your Body's Tears and Amer are what we refer to as neo-giallos. Both films are directed by Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani which I personally consider two of the most unique and interesting directors of the 21st century. These films are almost exclusively aesthetic and about the visual style and atmosphere, but they're amazing IMO. They're very messy and fucked up tho, and not for everyone. Very much nightmarish too.

 

Kwaidan is one of the best Japanese films of all time, a four part anthology film based around ghost stories. Four amazing stories that is as well-told as they are beautiful looking and superbly directed. Visually stunning and with some of that dreamy-feeling to it, tho not as nightmarish as Suspiria or Inferno.

 

But let's be honest here: Suspiria is a one-of-a-kind type of film, both narratively and visuallly. There's simply nothing quite like it.

 

 

Edit: the film below, Berberian Sound Studio, might also be one to check out for the feeling and atmosphere alone.

Edited by Bear

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On 7.7.2017 at 9:06 AM, Tokage said:

Berberian Sound Studio, I see this listed as a horror film in several locations, but to me it just feels like 'British nerd gets bullied by Foreigners: The Movie'. David Lynch's influence is palpable here, as well as the creator's love for the italo-horror scene. Great soundtrack and some VERY great visuals, but I found the movie to be lacking in terms of an actual story. 

 

I love this film, and I think it's very overlooked. I think it is a very wicked, weird and creepy film with an odd atmosphere and a nightmarish feeling to it. A film as much about hearing as seeing. Very interesting, very entertaining. Loved it!

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giphy.gif

 

 

Another huge name of cinema, and one of the biggest and most important names as far as horror goes, is gone. George A. Romero, an absolute legend.

 

Do yourself a favor and watch Night of the Living Dead, Dawn of the Dead, Day of the Dead, Martin, Knightriders and Creepshow if you haven't already.

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Nightmares in Red, White and Blue: The Evolution of the American Horror Film - Rewatched this as I was eating food last night, and this is still as good as it was years ago. It's not perfect and it's way too short, as it cover everything from the early 1900's to the first decade of the 2000's in 90 minutes. A documentary like this should've been 10+ hours long tbh, because you have to skip so much history when going this fast through it. But it does do a good job in covering the genre, even though it mainly focus on the bigger names of the genre as far as both films and directors goes. But it is what it is, and while it doesn't offer anything new to a horror nerd like me and barely scratches the surface of american horror cinema, it might offer a lot to you. Totally recommended!

 

Among the people interviewed is John Carpenter, George A. Romero, Joe Dante, Brian Yuzna, Roger Corman and more. And as always, watching and hearing George A. Romenro and Roger Corman interviewed is always a pleasure, and they are woth the 90 minutes alone.

 

 

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Universal Horror - A 90 minute long documentary about the glory days of Universal Studios and their Universal Monsters. It's a very good documentary that'll provide lots of fun and interesting info for people who aren't too familiar with the back stories and such, but if you are a horror maniac like myself you won't find much new info here. But it is a good documentary with lots of interesting and fun info/interviews. It is also superbly produced and crafted.

 

I've seen quite a lot of criticism towards the documentary, but you should just ignore all that as all they complain about is how it involves non-Universal films too. However, a lot of the non-Universal films are included to show clear inspiration from other films and scenes, such as the european (GERMAN!) silent horror era, and other companies in the US who produced similar films in many ways. But it's a great one!

 

Vincent Price's Dracula - An hour of Vincent Price hosting and narrating a documentary about Vlad Tepes/The Impaler/Dracula? Yeah, please! First off, he's got such an amazing voice and his way of telling things is incredible. Second off, he manage to make this documentary a bit campy, and he really uses himself for all its worth. He was once the master of campy horror, and he takes that with him into this documentary.

 

You can break the film into three parts:

 

1. One which is all about facts and who Vlad Tepes/the Impaler/Dracula is.

2. The fictionized version of him, where he known as a vampire called Nosferatu/Dracula, and how the idea of that character came through.

3. And a look at rituals, superstitions and stuff from, what was back then in 1985, modern day Transylvanian villages.

 

Are you interested in Vlad Tepes? Watch this!

Interested in Dracula? Watch this!

A fan of Vincent Price? Watch this!

 

And as one who is interested in both the first and a huge, huge fanboy of Vincent Price, this was a real pleasure for me. Loved it!

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Started watching the documentary series Eurotika! yesterday. Eurotika! is a 12 episode long documentary series about European exploitation cinema, with focus on horror, cult, sleaze, sex and trash. 3 episodes in, and this is no less than phenomenal. The episodes are less than 30 minutes long, but they di well in covering certain subject within the limited time they get, even though ever single episode so far could've been 1-2 hours longer. But so far it's been superb!

 

Episode 1, Vampires and Virgins

The first episode is dedicated to Jean Rollin, a French director known for his love for beautiful females, naked bodies and vampires. His films are often off-beat, poetic, slow-burning, erotic, dream-like and surreal, and more about imagery and atmosphere rather than anything the resembles a plot. It features interviews with Jean Rollin himself, Brigitte Lahaie, Catherine Castel and more. Jean Rollin comes off as really honest and down to earth.

 

Check out Requiem For a Vampire, The Nude Vampire and Fascination to get a taste of his work. This stuff will bore most of you to tears, but it's an unique experience for sure and it should be experienced. Can't think of anything like these films at all.

 

 

Episode 2, The Diabolical Mr. Franco

The second episode is all about Spanish cult director Jesús Franco and some of his work. Features interviews with Jesús Franco himself, as well as Brigitte Lahaie, Michel Lemoine, Caroline Munro and more. You don't get to cover much about his films in less than 30 minutes as he's got more than 200 films to his name, and that is only as a director. He's also credited as an writer for over 170 films and composer of soundtrack for over 70 films. A busy man, in other words. But you'll find lots of nice info and stuff here.

 

I recommend checking out Vampyros Lesbos, The Diabolical Dr. Z and The Awful Dr. Orloff to get a taste of his works. Low-budget, cheap films, but I love 'em. Especially Vampyros Lesbos is a complete cult classic with it's atmosphere and brilliant soundtrack.

 

Episode 3, Blood and Black Lace: A Short History of the Italian Horror Film

This one isn't about one specific director, but about the Italian horror films of the 60's through 80's, with its focus being mainly on Mario Bava, Dario Argento, and Lucio Fulci for obvious reasons. I think ther miss big time in the way they talk about Lucio Fulci as nothing but a shock director, but other than that it's a real nice one.

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Episode 5, From Barcelona... to Tunbridge Wells

From Barcelona... takes a look at Spanish director José Ramón Larraz, a man known best for his erotic horror films. It's a nice look at him and his work, and the interviews are very interesting. Some very funny moments too, where he and a friend and co-director can't seem to decide on who wanted the films to be bloody and who wanted them to be erotic. Kinda blame eachother.

 

Check out the masterpiece that is Vampyres, and also Symptoms, Black Candles/Hot Fantasies and Edge of the Axe. Four very different type of films, all great of course.

 

 

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