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saiko

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About saiko

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  1. saiko

    What the actual fuck... 2020 please, stop it right now.
  2. MAKE VISUAL KEI GREAT AGAIN.

     

     

    1. nikuman

      nikuman

      Bring back lyric videos made in windows movie maker 2020

      ....also i miss ViViD 😭 https://youtu.be/BTHs6bRSJmE

  3. Returning to the idol kei topic.

     

    Nowadays, when I watch/listen back to ViViD —one of the first VK bands I came across and one that I enjoyed the most— I think I can acknowledge the hints that actually indicate how heavily they were produced to appeal to the crowds in an idol way. So, they surely weren't that pure and artistical about VK and stuff, and of course could have had more than one A-side produced by one or more ghost-writters...

     

    But, let's be honest: can we ignore the fact that the arranges of their songs were fucking brilliant, and so were their skills as interpreters? Many, many kudos to Reno's polished approach to shredded guitar, IV's hyper-melodic bass lines, and Shin's VERY well managing of the VK vocal traits —whose exaggeration in some cases ruined great capacities forever, like what happened with Nightmare's Yomi— while at the same time enduring a full show delivering a constant and massive vocal flow.

     

    This band was a fucking thrill, although the commercial intention of their project became so blatantly notorious in their last releases that many fans (myself included) lost interest almost inmmediatly.

     

    That said, I really wish that nowadays' idol kei bands, even if they put their efforts to make that kind of career into the scene, at least make something commercial in the level of the quality bands like ViViD did back in their time. 

     

     

  4. saiko

    I'm not Japanese, but I always have this kind of weird ethnic betrayal feeling when I notice Japanese artists looking for the West to get better in any feature of their projects. Absurd feeling, but lol. Anyway, 2020 and still Japan has less developed theory and technology musicwise? I'm surprised.
  5. After listening PVs at random on Youtube, I decided to listen to a whole album of Lastier. I picked up their second. The first track kicked out, and the chords are killing me.  Fucking glorious.

     

     

    What the fuck, it's been so long since a band hooked up my ears like this. I hope this ride comes up with more great stuff!

    1. crucifiction

      crucifiction

      Lastier is pure perfection! You're in for a treat :D

  6. saiko

    10/10, definitely will look forward your next releases, and hope you save VK from its current misery state.
  7. Is anybody here interested in making a post about the 90s softvi movement? Yesterday I've got very hooked by a bunch of guys that I've never given the chance to listen to yet: Lastier, Jurassic, Close, Waive, and many more. Since they clearly don't belong to the more serious, gothic stuff that the category of visual kei calls for most of the time, I've turned my sight off them because they were mainstream appealing and blabla. But hey, they sound amazing! They bring all that 90s anime opening sound, powerful and dramatic, with that awesome chords modulations that made myself interest in J-music as a kid. So, if there's anyone here interested into giving more insight over them and/or music recomendations, here's your chance!

     

    This is what I found on a brief research over softvi. Still don't know enough Japanese to go into more insightful sites, so my information may remain very little till somebody enlightens me more lol:

     

    *They formed a large group into the 90s VK scene, and also many of them received constant attention from media (judging mostly from magazine covers);

    *They had a kind of specific aesthetics for them, both visual and sound wise;

    *Most of them (if not all of them) were signed under a label named Break out.

     

    So they were a thing back then, so I think they are a key point to anybody interested in looking for VK's history (although they've fallen into the obscure side of the Western fandom's radar even to this day).

     

     

    1. Show previous comments  3 more
    2. robkun

      robkun

      Softkei is the best kei! Check out CHILD. My all time favs!

       

      Softkei developed in the mid 90s as kind of like an antithesis to VK. Guys like SOPHIA and CASCADE kicked down the door to make it acceptable in the mainstream, while underground guys like 16,Piano, OZWORLD and Dias Ray were pioneering it in the underground. It was such a juggernaut by 1997 that already established bands like Glay, L’arc and Luna Sea started flirting with it.

       

      Softkei reached its peak around 1999/2000 when guys like Janne Da Arc and e.mu started breaking the Oricon top 20 charts, while it took over the underground VK scene quite rapidly at around the same time with countless acts blossoming around then, some of the more noteworthy being JURASSIC, ~Akira~, Wyse and Waive, among dozens of others.

       

      Unfortunately, softkei took a strong downward dip in popularity around 2003 when more traditional VK started to become more dominant, after rivaling softkei for several years. The mainstream appeal for softkei practically vanished around this time following the split of former leading major bands like e.mu and CASCADE. The only flagship bands that were still active at this point where Janne Da Arc and SOPHIA, whose popularity was eons past the visual kei lump-in. Tie in the fact that oshare kei became a major player in the visual underground at this time as well, and softkei was all but extinct by 2005.

       

      Softkei will always be my favorite subgenre of VK. I guess I’m just a sucker for a nice hook, blonde bands and a sky blue aesthetic lol.

    3. saiko

      saiko

      @robkunwow, AWESOME! Also, very nicely written! Thank you so much!

    4. robkun

      robkun

      You’re very welcome!!

  8. saiko

    These aesthetics are not the first thing that I would associate with Glay, but there you have them. Btw, does this classic from Kuroyume count as Y2K? Also, I think Pierrot had an interesting approach to Y2K, twisting it with magic and decadent, gothic tones (making their best era, imho): Lastly, I dare to say that Y2K is one of the key aspects of softvi aesthetics.
  9. saiko

    I think this synthesizes pretty much my own current state of mind with VK. Also, great analysis overall!
  10. Wow, interesting aesthetics!
  11. Yesterday I realized I can say, sing and humb any word, lyric and sound fx of MM's Merveilles live, like I already did in my childhood with my 90s Disney cartoons VHSs hahaha. Same happens with Dir's 1999 Ousaka Jou live and An Cafe's Shikisai On. 

     

    Do you feel the same about any other live recording?

  12. saiko

    I agree. Perhaps they tried to court everyone, but in the end failed to get them. Perhaps they withdrew behind Mana's artistic direction, and thus all MM less Gackt were dropped off Columbia; I can't imagine him, even Kozi or Yuuki playing pop, putting up 00s 64 bits softvi rockers aesthetics, surrounded by group of dancers, etc. They are artists, I think that's clear. Kozi, like Mana, even at the cost of losing their mainstream status (a thing that history has reserved to less than 10 bands in Japanese music history, even Dir or the Gazette never had the attention MM received from the media in the late 90s), decided to move on and run after a consistent artistic project within their own worldview. On the other hand, Gackt brought iconic moments to VK and J-rock (Mizerable, Vanilla, Redemption) but generally speaking he did the stuff that would attract masses.
  13. saiko

    Old manga, specially old shoujo manga, is my favorite field. Everything about it feels very serious, like compromised. I imagine mangaka being in a very position of treating their audience in a mature way, trying to deliver always fresh and clever stories and visuals. I guess the inmense anime industry, with all its idols, constant massive output and exitist ideology, was in diapers at that time, so I think everyone involved with creating comics and animation (from illustrators, scripters, producers, to musicians, etc.) had less commercial pressure and thus experimented more creative freedom. Also, like in VK, I crave for the overall melodramatic, tragic and sexual ambiguous aesthetics from the manga from that era, lol. What old shoujo anime would you recommend?
  14. saiko

    I've read New York New York from the same author. Very short and very well done series, very pleasant reading. One of the most human and touching manga readings I've had have so far. 70s, 80s and early 90s shoujo manga was a very interesting field of experimentation, which I feel it has been recently lost.
  15. saiko

    I was thinking about the same... Guess who will be the next newcomer to reach that numbers again... I remember being really enthusiastic about them at that time, "Ojamashimasu" was a fresh breathe blowing all over the scene... Then they started to rely on formula after formula like everybody does nowadays, so I dropped my care of them. I wish them the best.
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